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Technology Impact on Business Valuation

Just as with so many industries, technology is transforming the accounting industry. Gilmore Jasion Mahler CPA Jeff Denning works with many different business owners to determine the value of their businesses. He says there’s no question technology and artificial intelligence, or AI, are changing things. The real question, he says, is whether or not those changes are a good thing when it comes to trying to figure out what your business is worth.

Jeff Denning has over three decades experience as a CPA. His expertise is business valuation and forensic accounting.

Established in 1996, Gilmore Jasion Mahler, LTD (GJM) is the largest public accounting firm in Northwest Ohio, with offices in Maumee and Findlay. Locally owned, GJM offers cloud-based accounting and provides comprehensive services including assurance, business advisory, tax, risk advisory, healthcare management and outsourced accounting. The Firm’s professionals specialize in industries including construction & real estate, healthcare, manufacturing & distribution and utilities.  

The 8 Steps of Business Succession Planning

Jeff Denning Business Valuation Gilmore Jasion MahlerIt’s one of those issues that you may feel you don’t have time for because you’re too busy actually running your business. But it’s an important question you need to ask yourself. What are your plans for the business once you’re out of the picture? It’s surprising how few business owners actually know the answer. Statistics show that almost half of family businesses have absolutely no succession plan.

Gilmore Jasion Mahler and Croghan Colonial Bank recently teamed up to present a business succession planning workshop for area business owners. They offered some valuable takeaways including 8 steps to ensure a successful transition to new leadership.

First and foremost, be realistic about how long it will take to sell your business. Croghan’s Paul Wannemacher says the average time to sell a business once it’s listed for sale on the market is 6-11 months. He says one should also factor in 2-3 months to close once an agreement is reached.

“Make sure you’re ready when that prospective buyer does come along,” says Wannemacher. “Create a descriptive listing of the business as well as an overview. Just like when selling your house, you need to think about “curb appeal”. You may need to resurface the parking lot, freshen the landscape or painting to make it look more attractive to a potential buyer.”

Once you’ve tended to that first impression of your business and informed your key management, here are the 8 steps to succession planning:

  1. Get a handle on the marketplace. What’s the climate in your industry, the local economy and the national and international economies? Are there potential buyers out there?  Maybe your family members, managers within the company, maybe competitors?
  2. Pull together a team of advisors. This team should include your CPA, lawyer, wealth advisor and commercial banker.
  3. Get your business ready for transition
  • Review metrics
  • Make sure your records are accurate and up to date

It’s smart to anticipate some challenges along the way as you get your business ready for transition. Some of those challenges could include:

  • Normalizing your income statement
  • Cash flow/debt service history and capacity
  • The condition of your balance sheet
  • Collateral

Who is in the pool of potential buyers?

  1. Get a valuation

Gilmore Jasion Mahler CPA Jeff Denning is an expert in business valuation. He says the first question you need to ask yourself before getting a business valuation is: what are you offering to sell?

“Are you selling all of the transferable assets of your business or a fractional interest or equity share? What about your client and customer relationships? Your contracts? What about your workforce? We’re in the midst of a critical workforce shortage,” says Denning. “Many businesses are interested in acquiring other businesses right now to acquire their workers.”

Another challenge can be landing on an asking price for your business. Denning offers these questions to ask yourself:

  • Do you have a CFO or controller to assist in this process?
  • Do you have an outside CPA with valuation experience?
  • Do you need a business broker to help assess market potential or handle the entire sale process?
  • Do you need a real estate appraiser?
  • Grade your business against other comparable businesses
  • Is the business transferable? Owner-operated? How much risk of retaining customers?
  • Put yourself in the buyer’s shoes- your advisors should help with this perspective
  1. Create a personal financial plan: What amount of sale proceeds do you need to be satisfied? Look at your living expenses, vacations and spending you anticipate, family and charity goals. Don’t discount the emotional toll of finally leaving a business you’ve nurtured and built over the years.
  2. Prepare your family for the transition: The sooner you can let family members in the business know your plans the better. You may consider family wealth transfers through trusts or partnerships.
  3. Work with prospective buyers: Some things to keep in mind as you consider bids: how will loyal managers and employees be treated? Will the new owners continue with the company, improve it, or close it down?

“The buyer may want you to stay for a period of time after the sale. Just be very clear what that continuing role might be and how long will it last,” adds Croghan Bank’s Chris Kelly.Succession Planning Chris Kelly Paul Wannemacher Croghan

  1. Structure and close the sale

“Once you’ve identified a buyer, be aware that the final stretch can be as difficult as all the other steps that led you to this… and maybe more frustrating,” says Croghan’s Paul Wannemacher. “Will the business organization change? Will there be a reorganization? Are non-compete agreements needed?”

And, what type of financing is available?

  • Seller financing (you take on all the risk)
  • Conventional bank financing
  • SBA 7(a)
  • Collateral enhancement
  • Equity investors
  • ESOP

From assessing the marketplace to closing the sale, these eight steps are meant to be a guideline as you contemplate the future of the business you’ve worked so hard to build. While it may seem daunting, many financial experts agree that perhaps the worst thing you can do in regard to succession planning is to do nothing. If you and your financial team can come up with a strategy, you can rest assured that your exit will leave your business and your employees well positioned for future success.

Jeffrey S. Denning, CPA ABV, CFF is a partner with Gilmore Jasion Mahler, LTD. He has over 30 years of accounting experience, with a focus on providing services as an accredited business appraiser, forensic accountant, litigation consultant, and expert witness.

Chris Kelly is a Vice President and Commercial Loan Officer at Croghan Colonial Bank. He has over 20 years of experience in commercial banking, providing small to medium sized privately held businesses, nonprofits and professional firms with financial solutions.

Paul Wannemacher, CPA, PFS, CFP is a Vice President and Trust Officer at Croghan Trust & Investment Management. He has over 25 years of experience in trust administration, portfolio management, tax & financial planning and business consulting.

Established in 1996, Gilmore Jasion Mahler, LTD (GJM) is the largest public accounting firm in Northwest Ohio, with offices in Maumee and Findlay. Locally owned, GJM offers cloud-based accounting and provides comprehensive services including assurance, business advisory, tax, risk advisory, healthcare management and outsourced accounting. The Firm’s professionals specialize in industries including construction & real estate, healthcare, manufacturing & distribution and utilities

Is your Home Health Agency ready for PDGM?

Home healthcare PDGMChange is coming. Is your home health agency (HHA) ready? The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) recently announced a change coming in 2020 to the payment rate structure for home health agencies. The proposed rule brings other changes as well, changes you and your team need to be ready to implement. Its all part of the Patient-Driven Groupings Model (PDGM) that CMS says will drive better patient care based on patient needs and not the volume of care. In this article we’ll summarize the proposed changes. We’ll also offer up a short suggested to do list for any home health agency wondering where to start.

First, a look at some of the key changes for HHAs that take effect in January of 2020:

-Change the way episodic payments to home health agencies are made from a 60-day time frame to 30 days.

-Change in-home infusion therapy payment rates: temporary transitional payment rates for 2020, new permanent home infusion therapy rates to take effect in calendar year 2021.

-Home infusion therapy proposed payment changes:

                -Three payment categories for home infusion drugs

                -Payment rates to factor in geographic location (Geographic Adjustment Factor (GAF))

   -Higher payments for first home infusion therapy visit, small decrease in payment for each   visit after that

-Phase out Requests for Anticipated Payment (RAP) in an attempt to curb any potential program integrity possibilities.

-In an effort to improve access to care, allow therapy assistants to provide maintenance therapy. The change would be consistent with regulations for skilled nursing facilities.

-Adopt new quality measures to evaluate the effective transfer of home health information with the goal of improved patient safety and accurate medication lists.

-Adopt new patient assessment data including:

  • Cognitive function
  • Mental status
  • Special services
  • Treatments and interventions
  • Medical conditions and comorbidities
  • Social determinants of health

-Remove pain-related quality measures in an attempt to avoid over-prescription of opioids.

-Public report of Total Performance Scores (TPS) for home health agencies which could lead to better, more objective comparisons of caregivers and incentives for improved performance of HHAs.

“Most larger home health organizations are likely already well on their way to compliance ahead of the January 2020 adoption of the proposed rule,” says Gilmore Jasion Mahler Healthcare Specialist Jamie Dixon, CPA. “I’m already talking with my clients about this, they know it’s happening and are already preparing. It’s the smaller home health agencies with fewer resources that I am worried about.”

Jamie’s worked in the healthcare space for many years. A member of the Gilmore Jasion Mahler Healthcare Specialist Team, his focus areas include home health, hospice and skilled nursing. His experience includes Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement consulting, cost report preparation and review as well as specialized accounting issues related to healthcare entities.

He suggests three priorities for any HHA that doesn’t know where to start in preparing for the new regulations.

  1. Talk to your vendors. Make sure they’re aware of the changes.
  2. Make sure your billers are trained on the new system.
  3. Rely on trusted resources to learn more.

“In my mind, #3 is especially important,” says Dixon. “Your agency’s accounting firm should definitely be one of those trusted resources. I’m having a lot of conversations right now with my home health clients. Sometimes they just need to run something by me to get my take. Other times I’m more involved in driving decisions. This is a big change that involves some serious planning. Now is the time to prepare, so that when year-end comes, you’re ready for PDGM.”

You can learn more about the home health Patient-Driven Groupings Model (PDGM) on the CMS website where you’ll find several resources for home health agencies.

Established in 1996, Gilmore Jasion Mahler, LTD (GJM) is the largest public accounting firm in Northwest Ohio, with offices in Maumee and Findlay. Locally owned, GJM offers cloud-based accounting and provides comprehensive services including assurance, business advisory, tax, risk advisory, healthcare management and outsourced accounting. The Firm’s professionals specialize in industries including construction & real estate, healthcare, manufacturing & distribution and utilities.  

Get More Out of Your Health Savings Account

Health Savings AccountMillions of Americans use a health savings account, or HSA, to save for medical costs. But, are you getting the most out of your HSA? Gilmore Jasion Mahler CPA Charlie Heid recently tackled the topic in his monthly appearance on WTOL-TV.

The HSA or health savings account is a way to save money for medical expenses for people who have health coverage through a high deductible health plan.

You can pay for things like:

  • Doctor’s visits & copays
  • Surgery
  • Dental work
  • Flu shots

Unlike a flexible spending account, or FSA, which some people may get confused with an HSA, the HSA balance rolls over from year to year, and if you change jobs you can take your HSA with you.

Health savings accounts are referred to as a triple-tax free way to save… and here’s what that means:

  1. Your money goes into the account before its taxed
  2. It grows in the account tax deferred
  3. You can withdraw the money tax-free to pay for medical expenses

But there’s another benefit of the HSA that many people may not be aware of: when you turn 65 the HSA works like a traditional IRA. At 65 and older you can take money out and use it for whatever you want (not just medical expenses), though you would have to pay taxes on it when you do. But, you can still use that money tax-free for medical expenses in retirement.

There are some limits to what you can put into an HSA on an annual basis. They’ve actually gone up a bit in 2019 from 2018. A single person can put in up to $3,500 a year and a family can put in up to $7,000 per year.

If you’re 55 or older you can put in an extra $1,000 as a so-called catch-up contribution. That’s to help people who are nearing retirement age who feel they haven’t saved enough.

HSAs can be a powerful tool in saving for retirement. They can actually be invested in mutual funds to grow even further. If you do automatic payroll deduction for your HSA, unlike your 401(k) or IRA, that money isn’t subject to a federal income tax known as FICA, or the Federal Insurance Contributions Act, which goes toward Social Security and Medicare.

If you invest your HSA balance, be aware that some organizations can charge pretty big fees and some also have a required minimum balance before you’re allowed to invest.  

Some other things to keep in mind:

  • If you do invest your HSA, be sure to consult an expert so that you invest wisely
  • You can change the amount of your HSA contribution whenever you want, as long as you don’t go over the annual contribution limit
  • You need to keep receipts so that, if need be, you can prove that the medical expenses meet IRS requirements
  • Finally, other people can contribute to your health savings account. You can contribute separately from your payroll deduction. Your employer, family members or anyone else can also contribute as long as you stay below the annual contribution limit

CPA Charlie Heid is a partner specializing in tax services. He has been with Gilmore Jasion Mahler for 17 years and appears monthly on WTOL 11 Your Day to cover tax and money topics.

Established in 1996, Gilmore Jasion Mahler, LTD (GJM) is the largest public accounting firm in Northwest Ohio, with offices in Maumee and Findlay. Locally owned, GJM offers cloud-based accounting and provides comprehensive services including assurance, business advisory, tax, risk advisory, healthcare management and outsourced accounting. The Firm’s professionals specialize in industries including construction & real estate, healthcare, manufacturing & distribution and utilities.  

Business Valuation: What to Look for in an Expert

You know you need a business valuation, but who should do it and how in depth should it be? Gilmore Jasion Mahler Partner Jeff Denning specializes in business valuation and says be aware that the IRS or a court of law will have some requirements when it comes to the valuation, and who does the work. He offers some ideas on how to go about choosing the right person for the job.

Who does a valuation for your business is one of several important questions as you begin to research the process. For more information, see GJM's video blogs How Do You Figure Out the Value of Your Business, Business Valuation: Lengthy Report or Not, and What is the Business Valuation Process. Learn more about Jeff’s expertise in business valuation and forensic accounting, and don’t forget to sign up for GJM’s free quarterly newsletter The Expert with a focus on business valuation and litigation support. Just click here for quick and easy sign up.

Established in 1996, Gilmore Jasion Mahler, LTD (GJM) is the largest public accounting firm in Northwest Ohio, with offices in Maumee and Findlay. Locally owned, GJM offers cloud-based accounting services and provides comprehensive services including assurance, business advisory, tax, risk advisory, healthcare management and outsourced accounting. The Firm’s professionals specialize in industries including construction & real estate, healthcare, manufacturing & distribution and utilities